GUEST INFORMATION ABOUT THE TOUR

BEFORE YOU BOOK

We always advise that you arrive for the tour at least a day before the tour is set to start and leave the day after the tour ends.

  • By booking your accommodation the day before the tour starts and the day the tour ends, will leave you stress free from missing your tour and being late for your flight when you have to fly back. The travel distance back on the last day of the tour can be far and this can cause you to miss your flight. Although many clients prefer to travel back the same day the tour ends, we discourage this as far as possible. This can also cause unnecessary pressure on the entire group and that is the last thing that clients wants at the end of a wonderful tour.
  • If everyone in the group books into the pre and post tour accommodation, you can get to know your travel companion before the tour starts. If it is the end of the tour, this will be a great way to have final drinks together and share some great memories from the tour.
  • Let us know during the time of booking whether you would like to take up this offer and we can arrange it all together with your trip. It is a service that we are happy to offer.

MEALS ON TOUR

In your tour, there are only two meals a day that are included. For Namibian tours, only breakfast is provided in Windhoek and Swakopmund. For Botswana tours, only breakfast is provided in Victoria Falls. Water will be provided during the tour. Please notify us on your dietary requirements when making your booking.

BREAKFAST

Breakfast is served at the accommodation every morning. For the days where early activities are done, breakfast will be served after the activity otherwise it will be before that.

LUNCH

We do not provide lunch, but the restaurants at the lodges provide lunch which you then pay for. During activities, lunch packs can be provided by the accommodation and during traveling to the next destination, you will get a chance to buy lunch in a nearby town.

DINNER

Dinner is served at the accommodation’s restaurant and is included in the package unless otherwise stated in the itinerary. In Windhoek and Swakopmund for the Namibian tours, dinner is not provided and in Victoria Falls Zimbabwe, it is also not included.

LIFE ON TOUR

Guests come from all over the world and into a different environment which they have to adapt to. Africa has adapted to its visitors needs and many people who are involved in the tourism industry have put in a lot of effort to make the stay of guests as comfortable as possible, a home away from home. The infrastructure in Southern Africa is very sound and with English being widely spoken in all Southern African countries, makes the communication much better for guests to interact with the guides and other people they will encounter.

GUIDES

All the guides at Marek Adventures are qualified and have many years of experience. Although our guides are qualified for the work they do, guests should please remember that they are human too. Due to the long duration of tours and the long hours of work that they do, please be patient with the guides and don’t judge them. If you find there is a problem please address the issue in a calm and quiet manner. Our guides love their job and they want to share their experience with our guests, so please treat them with the respect and decency and you will get the same in return.

Please note that guides are not personal servants or butlers but will assist when help is needed. Guests often tend to hold guides responsible for things that are beyond their control, so please be fair to them.

There will be times that our guides will have to make decisions regarding to health, safety and security and circumstances beyond their control. This may cause the trip to be delayed or plans to change, but the guide will take into account the wishes of the group as a whole. Patience and understanding will be needed at these times.

Some guests like to be provided with a lot of information on tour while others prefer lesser information. It will be wise for this to be established beforehand and be discussed with the guide so that they can do something about the situation and handle it on tour and to avoid complaints after the tour. The tour guide has complete authority on tour and his/her decision is final, however you can contact our office on our emergency number if you would like to speak to someone in our office.

TIPPING

Tipping in Africa is not compulsory, however if you feel that the guide is doing a good job you may do so at your own discretion. Tipping at restaurants are usually 10% of the bill and more if you feel you received excellent service. 

THE GROUP

Traveling with a group can be hard at first, but it does have its advantages. Making friends with your fellow travelers, will help you enjoy your tour and an open mind may be necessary sometimes we have people with different cultures and nationalities in the group.

The guide is there to make sure that everything runs smoothly, so if you have any problems with the other guests or the guide himself or feel that someone is behaving unsociably, please make sure to address it in a mature and non-confrontational way to the individual or if you do not feel comfortable you can ask the guide to speak to them.

To avoid petty conflicts and travel peacefully, follow the guide’s schedule with regards to keeping the vehicle and the environment clean at all times.

AN AVERAGE DAY ON TOUR

The days on tour usually star early and end late. A lot of time is spent traveling, but we do get a lot of activities in during that day and try to keep to the daily schedule. There will be some frustrations that you can expect as in Africa things don’t always work out that well. Please come on tour with an open mind, a flexible attitude and realistic expectations.

An average day will start at 06:00 in the morning and departure is after breakfast. Due to the far distances to be traveled, you might have to leave earlier than 06:00 to catch the morning sunrise at an activity, but this is made up for during the tour where you will be staying at certain accommodations for 2 nights. This will give you more time to relax and unwind from the long travel. During winter the days are shorter. We will lose approximately 5 hours of daylight and it might happen that some optional activities are not available by the time you reach your next destination.

BEFORE YOU GO

WHAT TO PACK 

Luggage is limited to one backpack and one day pack weighing no more than 20kg. Many people make the mistake of bringing too many clothes on tour, but less is more in this instance. Please note that luggage should not include any hard covered suitcases with wheels, these bags have a solid frame and cannot be squeezed into spaces like backpacks or duffel bags. These bags are not comfortable to carry around you will have to carry it from place to place. For our camping tour, you will have to bring your own sleeping bag and pillow or buy it before you leave for the tour. Marek Adventures only provides mattresses and the tents.

Insurance & Liability:

Marek Adventures is not responsible for any costs incurred due to changes caused by natural disasters or other factors beyond our control. All travelers are required to have adequate travel insurance for emergency medical assistance and evacuation. Proof of insurance may be requested. Adequate cancelation and curtailment cover as well as luggage insurance are recommended. Marek Adventures accepts no liability for the death, injury, sickness or damage to any person or property.

Traveler Responsibility:

Marek Adventures endeavors to provide current and comprehensive travel information but does not accept responsibility or liability for omissions or inaccuracies. Travelers shall inform Marek Adventures of any factors and physical restrictions relevant for selection of travel routes, accommodation and activities. Travelers should be familiar with the itinerary and conditions of travel in Southern Africa. Travelers need to ensure that passports, visas and health certificates are valid for travel to each destination. Travelers shall adhere to the regulations of the legal authorities of Southern Africa.

NAMIBIA

Banking and Currency

Currency

The currency of Namibia is The Namibian Dollar (NAD; symbol N$) is in note denominations of N$200, 100, 50, 20 and 10. Coins are in denominations of N$5, N$1, 50 cents, 10 cents and 5 cents. It is linked to the South African Rand (R) on a 1:1 basis (South African Rand = 100 cents). The South African Rand is also acceptable as currency in Namibia.

The import and export of local currency is limited to N$50,000. The import of foreign currency is unlimited, provided sums equal to or exceeding NAD5,000 are declared on arrival. Export of foreign currency is unlimited up to the amount imported and declared.

Banking

Banking hours: Monday – Friday 09h00 to 15h30 and Saturday 08h30 to 11h00

Banks are found in most towns, with most being closed on Sundays and public holidays. Most of them offer foreign exchange services – with cash, bank and credit cards as well as travelers cheques.

American Express, Diners Club, Mastercard and Visa are accepted. Credit cards are not usually accepted at petrol stations, so bear this in mind when you visit the ATM. Setting aside an emergency petrol cash fund is a good idea if you’re planning to drive.

You can also obtain cash from many of the ATMs. Several international banks have branches in main city centers. Always advise your bank that you are travelling outside of the country as they might block your purchases if they have not been informed.

To avoid additional exchange rate charges, take traveler’s cheques in US Dollars or South African Rand. In general, you can expect a better exchange rate for traveler’s cheques than for cash.

Travel, Transport and Getting Around

Public transport in Namibia is geared towards the needs of the local populace, and is confined to main roads between major population centers. Although cheap and reliable, it is of little use to the traveler as most of Namibia’s tourist attractions lie off the beaten track.

It is easy to travel around Namibia by car, and a 2WD vehicle is perfectly adequate for most journeys. However, long distances, poor mobile phone coverage outside of main towns and infrequent petrol stations that only accept cash mean that planning ahead is vital.

There are major airlines that fly into Windhoek and Swakopmund. Other destinations are reachable by car or charter flight.

Namibians drive on the left and all signposts are in English. Seat belts must be worn at all times and talking in a mobile phone while driving is prohibited. The general speed limit is 120km/h on tarred roads outside of towns and 100km/h on gravel roads. In built up areas, the speed limit is 60km/h.

Food, Drink and Cuisine Advice

Traditional Namibian cuisine is rarely served and so the food at restaurants tends to be European in style and is, generally, of a very high standard.

Namibia is very meat-orientated, and many menu options will feature steaks from various animals. However, there is usually a vegetarian and seafood section offered by most camps and restaurants.

In the supermarkets you’ll find pre-wrapped fresh fruit and vegetables (though the more remote the areas you visit, the smaller your choice), and plenty of canned foods, pasta, rice, bread, etc. Most of this is imported from South Africa.

The water in Namibia’s main towns is generally safe to drink, though it may taste a little metallic if it has been piped for miles. Natural sources should usually be purified, though water from underground springs and dry riverbeds seldom causes any problems. However, filtered and bottled water are readily available in most towns and all camps, lodges and hotels.

Climate and Weather

Partially covered by the Namib Desert, one of the world’s driest deserts, Namibia’s climate is generally very dry and pleasant – it’s fine to visit all year round. Namibia only receives a fraction of the rain experienced by countries further east. Between about December to March some days will be humid and rain may follow, often in localized, afternoon thunderstorms. These are more common in the center and east of the country, and more unusual in the desert.

April and especially May are often lovely months in Namibia. Increasingly dry, with a real freshness in the air, and much greenery in the landscape; at this time the air is clear and largely free from dust.

From June to August Namibia cools down and dries out more; nights can become cold, dropping below freezing in some desert areas. As the landscape dries so the game in the north of the country gravitates more to waterholes, and is more easily seen by visitors. By September and October it warms up again; game-viewing in most areas is at its best, although there’s often a lot of dust around and the vegetation has lost its vibrancy.

November is a highly variable month. Sometimes the hot, dry weather will continue, at other times the sky will fill with clouds and threaten to rain – but if you’re lucky enough to witness the first rains of the season, you’ll never forget the drama.

Clothing and Dress Recommendations

Namibians have a somewhat relaxes attitude to dress codes. A jacket and tie is very unusual. In fact, long trousers and a shirt with buttons are often quite adequate for a formal occasion or work wear. A pair of sensible shoes, jeans and a t-shirt is recommended.

During the day it is generally hot, so pack light weight loose fitting clothes in natural fabrics, such linen or cotton that will keep you cool and are easy to wash and dry.

Avoid blue clothing – the tsetse flies are drawn to the colour blue, and their bite can give you African Sleeping Sickness.

Long sleeved shirts and long trousers will protect your against mosquitoes at night.

Electricity and Plug Standards

Electrical sockets in Namibia are Type M (SABS-1661). If your appliance’s plug doesn’t match the shape of these sockets, you will need a travel plug adapter in order to plug in. Travel plug adapters simply change the shape of your appliance’s plug to match whatever type of socket you need to plug into. If it’s crucial to be able to plug in no matter what, bring an adapter for all types.

Electrical sockets in Namibia usually supply electricity at 230 volts AC / 50 Hz frequency. If you’re plugging in an appliance that was built for 230 volt electrical input, or an appliance that is compatible with multiple voltages, then an adapter is all you need. If your appliance isn’t compatible with 230 volts, a voltage converter will be necessary.

Botswana

Banking and Currency

Currency

Botswana’s currency is Pula (which means ‘rain’ in Setswana). It is divided into 100 thebe (which means ‘shield’ in Setswana). Travelers’ cheques and foreign currency may be changed at banks, bureau de change and authorized hotels.

The US dollar, Euros, British Pound and the South African Rand are the most easily convertible currencies (and accepted by some establishments – but, generally, then an inflated rate of exchange will be applied).

Banking

Seven main commercial banks, as well as a number of foreign exchange bureau, operate in Botswana. Operating hours are Monday to Friday 08h30 to 15h30 and Saturday 08h30 to 10h45.

Full banking services are available in major towns, although ATMs are sprouting up all over the country. Most credit cards are accepted at hotels and restaurants. Cultural sites and community art and craft outlets usually only accept cash.

Travel, Transport and Getting Around

Public transport in Botswana is geared towards the needs of the local populace and is confined to main roads between major population centers. Although cheap and reliable, it is of little use to the traveler as most of Botswana’s tourist attractions lie off the beaten track.

Driving off the main roads in Botswana is only recommended to expects in 4×4 vehicles, that are equipped correctly. Most lodges offer transfers or they can be arranged. If, however, you will be driving in Botswana: your home driving license will be accepted (with an official English translation if necessary; driving is on the left side of the road; and the national speed limit is on tarred roads is 120km/h and 60km/h in towns and villages.

Be sure to watch out for wild animals on the roads!

There are major airports in Maun, Kasane and Gaborone, while smaller charter flights are used to get to the other top attractions and camps.

Food, Drink and Cuisine Advice

Safari lodges and camps serve international-style cuisine, generally of an extremely high standard, along with local beer and imported wine and spirits. Good restaurants and bars can be found in main towns, often within hotels. Beef and goat are very popular meats. Elsewhere, food is more basic: millet and sorghum porridge are the local staples.

Tap water is considered safe to drink, although outside main cities and towns, visitors are advised to check first and sterilize water if in any doubt. Bottled water is available in most tourist centers. Filtered water is available at most camps and shops offer bottled water – it is advised to be well stocked of bottled water if you are travelling off the beaten track. Milk is pasteurized, and dairy products, local meat, poultry, seafood, fruit and vegetables are generally safe.

A discretionary five-to-ten-percent tip is typical for restaurant bills. In many places, a service charge is automatically added. It is customary to tip the game guide and lodge staff while on safari.

Climate and Weather

Botswana’s climatic pattern is typical of southern Africa, although its rainfall is less than countries further east. The rains in Botswana come mostly between December and March, when average minimum temperatures are in the low 20°s. Some days will be bright and sunny, some will have afternoon thunderstorms, and some will just be grey.

As with Namibia, April and May in Botswana are generally lovely, with the sky clear and the landscape green. Night temperatures start to drop during these months, especially in the Kalahari. Note that places in and around the Okavango tend to have less extreme, more moderate temperatures than the drier areas of the Kalahari.

From June to August the night-time temperatures in drier areas can be close to freezing, but it warms up rapidly during the day, when the sky is usually clear and blue. It’s now very much ‘peak season’ for most safari areas: the land is dry in most areas so the animals congregate around the few available water sources.

This continues into September and October, when temperatures climb again, drying the landscapes and concentrating the game even more. This is the best time for big game safaris – although October can feel very hot, with maximum temperatures sometimes approaching 40°C.

November is difficult to predict, as it can sometimes be a continuation of October’s heat, whilst sometimes it’s cooled by the first rains; it’s always an interesting month.

Clothing and Dress Recommendations

In summer, lightweight, light coloured cottons are preferable. Avoid synthetic materials and black clothing, as they increase perspiration and discomfort. In winter, wear trousers, long-sleeved shirts / blouses and jerseys. From May – August, night temperatures can fall below zero degrees celsius, so warm jerseys and jackets are vital, especially on morning and evening game drives. Garments of neutral colours that blend with the bush and forest are advisable for safaris and game viewing. Bring a lightweight jacket and/or jersey for unexpected temperature changes or rain. Closed, comfortable walking shoes or gym shoes are a must in all seasons. Special attention should be given to protection from the sun. Bring a sunhat, good quality sunscreen, sun lotion and polarised sunglasses. Wide brimmed sun hats are essential.

Electricity and Plug Standards

Electrical sockets (outlets) in Botswana are the ‘Type M’ South African SABS1661 (‘Large’ 15 amp BS-546) sockets. This is actually an old British standard. The ‘Type M’ South African plug and socket is not to be confused with the ‘Type D’ Indian plug and socket. In pictures, they look very similar, but the South African type is much larger than the Indian type, and they are physically incompatible. If your appliance’s plug doesn’t match the shape of these sockets, you will need a travel plug adapter in order to plug in. Travel plug adapters simply change the shape of your appliance’s plug to match whatever type of socket you need to plug into.

Electrical sockets (outlets) in Botswana usually supply electricity at between 220 and 240 volts AC. If you’re plugging in an appliance that was built for 220-240 volt electrical input, or an appliance that is compatible with multiple voltages, then an adapter is all you need.

But travel plug adapters do not change the voltage, so the electricity coming through the adapter will still be the same 220-240 volts the socket is supplying. If you need to use appliances that are not compatible with 220-240 volt electrical input, you will need a voltage converter.

ZIMBABWE

Banking and Currency

Currency

Zimbabwe uses its own unit of currency, the Zimbabwe Dollar.  No other currency is accepted. Do not plan on being able to use cash machines in Zimbabwe to draw money. Before leaving home please exchange all the money that you will need for your trip. Most of this should be in 1, 5, 10 and 20 denominations because change is not always available. In an emergency you can try Barclays Bank, Stanbic Bank or Standard Chartered Bank as they will infrequently accept foreign debit cards for withdrawing cash.

Banking

Banks in Zimbabwe are open for business Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 08h00 to 15h00, on Wednesdays from 08h00 to 13h00 and Saturdays from 08h00 to 11h30. They are closed on Sundays and Public Holidays.

Only VISA and MasterCard are accepted in Zimbabwe, however it should be noted that very limited facilities will have credit card machines, and the connection is not always reliable so it is advisable to carry cash as back up.

Travel, Transport and Getting Around

Taxis are safe and reliable, and can be booked through your hotel front desk. Taxis in cities travel within a 40km radius of the city. Always take a taxi at night.

Major airlines fly into Victoria Falls, Harare and Bulawayo. Charter flights are available to most attractions and camps.

Zimbabwe has a good road infrastructure, by African standards, although potholed. Between major towns, there are frequent road blocks. Traffic drives on the left side of the road.

If you are driving yourself around Zimbabwe, be sure to check on fuel availability in advance. If you are covering long distances within the country, ensure you carry extra fuel in 5 or 10lt metal containers in case of emergency. Fuel is generally available, but supply can fluctuate. Fuel is only available for cash.

Climate and Weather

In Zimbabwe, the rains come principally in DecemberJanuary, February and March; the further north you are, the earlier the precipitation arrives and the later it leaves. Zimbabwe’s higher eastern areas usually receive more rainfall than the lower-lying western ones.

By April and May most of the rain is gone, leaving a verdant setting, which is starting to dry out. Especially in more southerly and higher locations, the night-time temperatures start to drop.

The nights in JuneJuly and August become much cooler, so don’t forget to bring some warmer clothes, in case you want to spend an evening outside; the days are still clear and warm. For Zimbabwe, this is the start of the ‘peak season’– days are often cloudless and game sightings continually increase.

Into September and October the temperatures rise once again: Zimbabwe’s lower-lying rift valley – Mana Pools – can get very hot in October. During this time, you’ll see some fantastic game, as the Zimbabwe’s wildlife concentrates around the limited water sources.

November is unpredictable; it can be hot and dry, it can also see the season’s first rainfalls – and in this respect it’s a very interesting month, as on successive days, you can see both weather patterns.

Clothing and Dress Recommendations

When in Zimbabwe the cardinal rule is to wear casual, comfortable clothes during the day as temperatures can get very hot. It is advisable to wear light loose-fitting clothing, such as cotton or linen, as they are cool and easy to wash. Warmer clothes are advised for the evenings and rainwear for the wet season.

A brimmed hat and sunglasses are a good idea year-round. Long-sleeved shirts and long trousers will also guard against the scorching sun rays. It is recommended you wear light shoes, especially if your itinerary entails a lot of walking.

For safaris, please remember to wear appropriate clothing and shoes. Earth colour clothes, such as browns, greens and tans are advisable.

Electricity and Plug Standards

Electrical sockets in the Republic of Zimbabwe are Type G (BS-1363) and Type C (CEE 7/16 Europlug) and Type D (BS-546).  If your appliance’s plug doesn’t match the shape of these sockets, you will need a travel plug adapter in order to plug in. Travel plug adapters simply change the shape of your appliance’s plug to match whatever type of socket you need to plug into. If it’s crucial to be able to plug in no matter what, bring an adapter for all types. Electrical sockets usually supply electricity at 230 volts AC / 50 Hz frequency.  If you’re plugging in an appliance that was built for 230 volt electrical input, or an appliance that is compatible with multiple voltages, then an adapter is all you need. If your appliance isn’t compatible with 230 volts, a voltage converter will be necessary.

SOUTH AFRICA

Banking and Currency

Currency

The currency is the Rand, which is divided into 100 cents. There are R200, R100, R50, R20 and R10 notes. Coins come in R5, R2, R1, 50c, 20c, 10c and 5c.

Banking

Banks are found in most towns, and are generally open from 09h00 to 15h30 on weekdays and 08h30 to 11h00 on Saturdays (Closed Sundays and Public Holidays). Most of them offer foreign exchange services – with cash, bank & credit cards as well as travelers cheques. You can also obtain cash from automatic teller machines (ATMs). Several international banks have branches in the main city centers. Always advise your bank that you are travelling outside of the country as they might block your purchases if they are not informed.

Travel, Transport and Getting Around

Travelling around South Africa is relatively easy by air, road and rail.

Principal air routes are serviced by SAA and British Airways. There are also low-cost carriers on main routes, namely Kulula.com, Mango and Safair. Facilitating travel around South Africa are 10 airports managed by the Airports Company South Africa (Acsa). In addition, there are some 90 regional airports, including the Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport in Nelspruit and the Skukuza Airport, offering access to the Kruger National Park.

An extensive tarred road system makes travelling in South Africa by vehicle convenient and easy. You will find gravel roads in rural areas though. Please note that a valid international driver’s licence is required. We drive on the left-hand side of the road. Most global car hire firms have branches in South Africa and Uber is available.

Another means of getting around South Africa are inter-city bus services such as Greyhound and Trans-Lux. Metrobus buses are available for in-city transport. Metered taxis must be ordered by telephone.There is the popular MyCityBus system in Cape Town as well as a hop-on-hop-off tourist bus in Cape Town and Johannesburg.

The rail system includes the long-haul, inexpensive Shosholoza Meyl Metrorail trains. More luxurious options are the Blue Train, Premier Classe and the steam train Rovos Rail.  There is also the Gautrain rapid transit railway system in Gauteng Province llinking Sandton and Marlboro to the O.R.Tambo International Airport and a Commuter Service linking Rhodesfield, Marlboro, and Sandton (east-west link) and Park, Rosebank, Sandton, Midrand, Centurion, Pretoria Central and Hatfield (north-south link). All stations with the exception of the Airport station have integrated car parking facilities.

 Food, Drink and Cuisine Advice

Standards of hygiene in relation to food health and safety in South Africa, are generally high in hotels, restaurants, pubs and nightspots. Tap water in South Africa is safe to drink and cook with when taken from taps in urban areas. Not all tap water in rural areas is safe for consumption, so take precautions if necessary. It is safe to eat fresh fruit, vegetables and salads, and put ice in your drinks. South Africa’s fish, meat and chicken are of excellent quality, so there is no need to limit yourself when enjoying the local cuisine. Restaurants are subject to South Africa’s food safety control legislation, which is implemented by local government.  Regulations include certification and regular inspections by health inspectors to ensure hygienic standards are maintained. Street food is not as common in South Africa as it is in other countries, although vendors selling traditional snacks and meals can be found in city centers and townships. Food safety in such instances cannot always be guaranteed.

Climate and Weather

South African temperatures, which are measured in centigrade, average at highs of 28°C to average lows of 8°C in the summer months while winter temperatures range from 1°C at night to around 18°C in the day.  Average annual rainfall is on the low side at under 500mm a year, making the country somewhat dry.  Much of the rain falls in the Western Cape in the winter, differing from the rest of the country, which experiences summer rainfall. On the plus side, the South African climate boasts more than its fair share of sunshine, recording an average of 8.5 hours a day.

Clothing and Dress Recommendations

Summer

Bring clothes that are cool, light and comfortable because summer temperatures can get well into the 30 – 40 degree Celsius range in some areas. Also bring an umbrella or raincoat during summer as this is when most of the country gets its rain, but don’t forget a swimming costume (bathing suit).

Winter

The winters are generally mild, comparing favourably with European summers.  But there are days when temperatures dive, especially in high-lying areas such as the Drakensberg, so be prepared with jerseys and jackets. Cape Town gets its rain during the winter season so it’s advisable to bring rain gear along.

General

Always bring a hat, sunglasses and sunblock as the sun can be strong even in the winter months. Walking shoes are a good idea all year-round, with warm socks in the winter.

If you are doing business in the country, business attire (suit and tie) is generally called for in the corporate sector, but media for example generally dress more casually. For game viewing, a couple of neutral-toned items will be useful, but there’s no need to go overboard. A good pair of walking shoes is also advisable. For the evening, if you are dining at an upmarket restaurant or seeing a show, smart-casual attire is recommended.

Electricity and Plug Standards

Electrical sockets in the Republic of South Africa are Type M (SABS-1661).  If your appliance’s plug doesn’t match the shape of these sockets, you will need a travel plug adapter in order to plug in. Travel plug adapters simply change the shape of your appliance’s plug to match whatever type of socket you need to plug into. If it’s crucial to be able to plug in no matter what, bring an adapter for all types. Electrical sockets in South Africa usually supply electricity at 230 volts AC / 50 Hz frequency. If you’re plugging in an appliance that was built for 230 volt electrical input, or an appliance that is compatible with multiple voltages, then an adapter is all you need. If your appliance isn’t compatible with 230 volts, a voltage converter will be necessary.